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Photo 16 Apr 762 notes

(Source: tripouts)

Photo 5 Apr 1,538 notes spaceplasma:

Metallicity

In astronomy and physical cosmology, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. Because stars, which comprise most of the visible matter in the universe, are composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, astronomers use for convenience the blanket term “metal” to describe all other elements collectively. Thus, a nebula rich in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon would be “metal-rich” in astrophysical terms even though those elements are non-metals in chemistry. This term should not be confused with the usual definition of “metal”; metallic bonds are impossible within stars, and the very strongest chemical bonds are only possible in the outer layers of cool K and M stars. Earth-like chemistry therefore has little or no relevance in stellar interiors.
The metallicity of an astronomical object may provide an indication of its age. When the universe first formed, according to the Big Bang theory, it consisted almost entirely of hydrogen which, through primordial nucleosynthesis, created a sizeable proportion of helium and only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium and no heavier elements. Therefore, older stars have lower metallicities than younger stars such as our Sun.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)

spaceplasma:

Metallicity

In astronomy and physical cosmology, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. Because stars, which comprise most of the visible matter in the universe, are composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, astronomers use for convenience the blanket term “metal” to describe all other elements collectively. Thus, a nebula rich in carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon would be “metal-rich” in astrophysical terms even though those elements are non-metals in chemistry. This term should not be confused with the usual definition of “metal”; metallic bonds are impossible within stars, and the very strongest chemical bonds are only possible in the outer layers of cool K and M stars. Earth-like chemistry therefore has little or no relevance in stellar interiors.

The metallicity of an astronomical object may provide an indication of its age. When the universe first formed, according to the Big Bang theory, it consisted almost entirely of hydrogen which, through primordial nucleosynthesis, created a sizeable proportion of helium and only trace amounts of lithium and beryllium and no heavier elements. Therefore, older stars have lower metallicities than younger stars such as our Sun.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and H. Richer (University of British Columbia)

Video 5 Apr 7,499 notes

infinity-imagined:

The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy

Photo 5 Apr 15,010 notes
Text 3 Apr

you’re the impulse in my motivations; a light in the darkness, a possibility i hope to have.

Photo 3 Apr 1,492 notes

(Source: soloveimudak)

Video 3 Apr 183 notes
Photo 3 Apr 120,804 notes fungi:

All the planets as one

fungi:

All the planets as one

Text 3 Apr

You’re the fire in my motivations,

Eveything I do is seemingly for you,

You make me feel, like a primal animal, waiting for you.

Photo 30 Mar 1,045 notes

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